6 Unheard of Facts about Indian Beaches

Indian coastline measures of bewildering 7,517 km and is home to many scenic and beautiful beaches. Most of the Indian beaches are ranked as per popularity and footfall. There are many virgin beaches in India irrespective of millions of tourist on an annual basis. All the things which offer a unique experience on the beach are a wide open sea, carpet of sand and amazing waves all together.

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Picture Courtesy: pinimg.com

We will look at the 6 different beaches in India which offer more than these things. These are some of the beaches with certain statistics of facts and figure attached to them. While all these are popular beaches, at the same time some undiscovered facts are not so common. So let’s have a look at all these and what they hold within:-

AUROVILLE BEACH, TAMIL NADU
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Picture Courtesy: ytimg.com

Auroville is uncommon experiential vicinity located near Puducherry in Tamil Nadu. The communities are divided here into neighborhood on the basis of English, French, Sanskrit and Tamil. This beach is home town for several citizens from across the world. Here you won’t find any coin or currency but account numbers with “Aurocard”.

MARINA BEACH, TAMIL NADU
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Picture Courtesy: namathuchennai.blogspot.com

It’s quite a famous beach of India and the fact is that it’s the longest and natural urban beach. Marina beach is also 11th longest in the world. Total length of the beach is 13 km and attracts at least 30 thousand visitors in a single day. Despite having swimming and bathing prohibited on this beach, it still remains one of the most crowded beaches in India.

VERSOVA BEACH, MUMBAI

Boracay Beach

Picture Courtesy: homesfy.in

Located in Mumbai, this beach faces the Arabian Sea. Original name of the village is “Versave” meaning rest in Marathi, native language of Mumbai. The history of “Versova is long and pretty interesting.

First mention goes back in 1694 when Arabs fleet landed here and killed everyone. After that the beach was held by the Portuguese in the medieval period. Then in 1739, Marathas took control over Versova after defeating the Portuguese. They were ousted by the British in 1774. Currently, on one end of the beach, small fishing community of Kolis reside.

SATAPADA BEACH, ODISHA
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Picture Courtesy: tripstoroadslesstravelled.blogspot.com

Satpada beach is located in Puri district of Odisha. It’s quiet offbeat and coastal area which offers a lot. Most fascinating feature is the Chilka Lake on one side and Bay of Bengal on the other. Taste of seafood here is unique because of the mix of fresh and salty water. This beach is also popular because of Chilka dolphins which can be seen easily through hiring a boat.

VAGATOR BEACH, GOA
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Picture Courtesy: www.youtube.com

This beach is perhaps most festive of all other beaches in India. First hippie haunt in Goa was this beach. The famous Sunburn Festival moved to this beach in 2013. This beach is home to many parties and trance meets and continues to attract various wanderers and backpackers. Some amazing food joints and cafes around this area can be found. But in spite of all these, peace and solitude of this beach is worth the visit.

JUHU BEACH, MUMBAI
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Picture Courtesy: www.youtube.com

This beach is situated 18 kms from Mumbai, around the shores of Arabian Sea. This beach is extremely famous for its food court and stalls at its entrance. The food court provides Mumbaiyya food which is authentic like bhel puri and vada paav. Also it is known for its Juhu Citizen Welfare Group which has its own publication on monthly basis named as The Juhu Citizen. It’s the only Indian beach to do publish on its own name. It is also considered as one of the dirtiest beaches of India according to a survey.

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